How South Korea Handle Coronavirus?

Can the COVID-19 survive in drinking water?

Currently, there is no evidence about the survival of the COVID-19 virus in drinking-water or sewage.

How long does the virus that causes COVID-19 last on surfaces?

Recent research evaluated the survival of the COVID-19 virus on different surfaces and reported that the virus can remain viable for up to 72 hours on plastic and stainless steel, up to four hours on copper, and up to 24 hours on cardboard.

What are the organs most affected by COVID‐19?

The lungs are the organs most affected by COVID‐19

Can I get COVID-19 from eating fresh food?

There is currently no evidence that people can catch COVID-19 from food, including fruits and vegetables. Fresh fruits and vegetables are part of a healthy diet and their consumption should be encouraged.

Does the virus that causes COVID-19 die faster on a porous surface?

The virus dies faster on porous surfaces than on non-porous surfaces due to capillary action within pores and faster aerosol droplet evaporation.

Is it safe to take paracetamol before receiving the COVID-19 vaccine?

Taking painkillers such as paracetamol before receiving the COVID-19 vaccine to prevent side effects is not recommended. This is because it is not known how painkillers may affect how well the vaccine works.

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Do weather and climate determine where COVID-19 occurs?

No. There is currently no conclusive evidence that either weather (short term variations in meteorological conditions) or climate (long-term averages) have a strong influence on transmission.

What are the common side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine?

Reported side effects to COVID-19 vaccines have mostly been mild to moderate and short-lasting. They include: fever, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, chills, diarrhoea, and pain at the injection site. The chances of any of these side effects following vaccination differ according to the specific COVID-19 vaccine.

Are smokers more likely to develop severe disease with COVID-19?

Tobacco smoking is a known risk factor for many respiratory infections and increases the severity of respiratory diseases. A review of studies by public health experts convened by WHO on 29 April 2020 found that smokers are more likely to develop severe disease with COVID-19, compared to non-smokers.

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